Daddy and Munchkin Blog
Bedside Cot – Chicco Next 2 me Review

An important decision

Your new arrivals first sleeper is an important decision, amongst many others. It’s got to fit your budget (alongside all the millions things you need at the start), may need to provide functions above and beyond sleeping at home such as as a travel cot, be safe and comfortable and support that new little ones early development. For us, it was a Next 2 me. Why? Well here’s our Chicco Next 2 Me Review.

Design

There are multiple options/editions of the Next 2 Me cot (see versions below) . This review is based on the Next 2 me Dream. This was the middle of the road option but with all the essential bells and whistles we required.

next 2 me review
Image from Chicco.co.uk

The Next 2 Me fit its purpose for us for multiple reasons. Firstly, Munchkin was breast-fed for the first six months, so easy access was essential. Natalie found it super easy to pick him up, give him a feed and pop him back down without leaving the duvet (that’s messy nappies aside though, as that’s usually where I pitched in).

It had a great mattress too. As the early age, babies backs are developing and need a good supportive mattress. The next 2 me was suitable from birth for all night sleeping so that’s ticked off. Other features included a reclinable side, to change it from a side of bed sleeper to a full on cot. It had a tilt mode, to help with nights of bad reflux and 6 different levels to make a snug fit to any bed.

Out and About

The Next 2 me easily doubled up as a travel cot. Munchkin was born pre-covid, so it was essential to have something we could easily pack up, pop in the car and take to family and friends or on holiday. The Next to me was simple to collapse and build, leaving to frustration free sleeps away from home. It fitted simply in the boot and had simple instructions to pass on when needed.

Price, versions and where to purchase

The next 2 me range comes in a range of options. Ours was middle of the road, and picked up in a Mothercare sale which knocked a few bob off (RIP mothercare, which lost the retail battle). However, models range from the most basic ‘Air’ with 1 level mattress and zip side access (£129 John Lewis) to ‘Dream’ with multi level (for when they start to sit) and fold down side mechanism (£199 Argos) to the full out ‘Magic’ (£227 Argos (promotion Jul 2021, usually £227)) with wheels to move the crib about, one handed access, rocking mode and improved mechanisms for folding and storage. If you’re looking for something more permanent for they also have the ‘Forever’ which triples up as a side-sleeping cot, traditional cot and floor bed for toddlers (£329 John lewis).

Overall and Stars

An essential bit of kit and perfect for our needs.

Rating: 5 out of 5.

Daddy reviewed, Munchkin approved

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Sundown Adventureland Review

I wanted to do something with Munchkin for my birthday, and Nanny has always said about Sundown Adventureland, which was somewhere I fondly remembered from my childhood, ever since before Munchkin was born. I have reviewed the other parks we have visit with Munchkin including Hobbledown and Chessington World of Adventure, so here is my Sundown Adventureland Review.

What is Sundown Adventureland?

Maybe this video will answer that?

Sundown Adventureland is a theme park aimed at the under 10’s. It features numerous play parks, all with different themes from an old American wild west cavalry post, to a pirate cove, a sand pit play zone and Angry birds themed play area. Then there are themed zones to walk through and play in, including story book houses, the yellow brick road and a toy town, with miniature town buildings to go through and explore. There are multiple rides, including a train ride, tractor, a boat ride (where you get soaked), flying pigs, tea cups and an ostrich ride. There’s a driving school, but you have to be slightly taller (over 1.0 m) to have a go at that one.

Entry cost varies throughout the year. We visited in early June so it was off-season. This meant rides were subject to opening times, but the entry price was reduced to £14.50 for adults and children over 90 cm in comparison to £17.50 in summer*. Children under 90 cm are free, and are also too short for most of the rides, but have plenty of play parks to explore. *Prices correct as of June 2020.

Covid guidelines

Having visited during the pandemic. Its only right I assess their Covid guidelines and how they were managed.

It all honesty it was slightly mixed bag here. There was no temperature testing on arrival, like that used in many other places. There were zones in which masks were to be worn, but the signage wasn’t always the clearest. Some rides had clear social distancing markings, but many did not, and where they didn’t, people didn’t tend to distance.

One thing they did well however, was clean every ride every time. Thankfully it was low season and this didn’t add to the wait times.

Munchkin’s experience

At just over 90 cm Munchkin could go on all but one ride, and being low season, he went on all but one ride, and some twice!

He had an absolute ball, he was completely made up when he saw the Noah’s Ark play area as we arrived and that was just the start. He left multiple rides asking ‘again Daddy/Nanny!’. Even if he seemed to look a little scared on the rides, I now realise that was his interested face. He was thrilled to ride a tractor and the train and bounce up and down on the ostrich ride. We had to pull him out of every park to explore the next area. He had the time of his life and we can’t wait to take him again.

There were so many bits maintained from my childhood which were a joy for me and Nanny to explore. I had vivid memories of the yellow brick lane and Nanny loved seeing and exploring the miniature town like we did when we were children.

Food and drink

There are several establishments on site offering hot food which is ‘tasty, not gourmet’ (their words not mine, but do sum it up quite well). Two of these offer soft play too to give parents a rest, though these were closed when we visited due to restrictions. If you would like to bring your own, there’s tons of space for a picnic and the car park is a short walk from the entrance.

Where do you find it?

Sundown Adventureland is located east of the A1, east of Worksop and north-west of Lincoln.

Sundown Adventureland Review

Sundown Adventureland Review Star Rating

Taking away a half star for the little annoyance of limited Covid-10 restrictions, we would give Sundown Adventureland:

Rating: 4.5 out of 5.

This rating is for perfect park cleanliness, really reasonable pricing, the variety on offer and the enjoyment had by myself, Nanny and Munchkin.

Daddy reviewed, Munchkin Approved.

Thanks for reading,

Daddy and Munchkin

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Making a Toddler Wall on a Budget

Its nice to give children a space that feels their own. We had our Mutable (What’s one of those?) in a corner of our lounge against a plain wall and it lacked something. I decided this needed to change it by adding some things like prints, to make this corner, his corner and make a toddler wall on a budget.

A Toddler Wall on a Budget

Its always nice to save a pound or two on a project, so I decided to make these things on my own. This turned buying three prints and frames, two wire words and two wire images for around £70 down to less than £20. Here’s how I did it and made a toddler wall on a budget.

Drag the bar to see it transform

Make Prints on Canva

If you haven’t heard of Canva, where have you been hiding? It is the most useful web based application for digital design. See all those images I make for each of my posts? They are all made on Canva!

Now to make prints. First, take some inspiration from the world of Etsy and get a design in mind. I decided to go for a never stop exploring visual design and then a ‘be kind’ rainbow and ‘play, dream, explore’ below. I used a free trial to make these, meaning all the premium art and fonts were accessible, designed them, downloaded them and sent them to Snapfish for printing. We then popped to a discount store for some cheap but reasonably nice frames and got a pack of 3M Command strips and we were away.

Handmake Wire Words

I really wanted some wire words after finding them on Instagram, but at £8 – 11 per design, I thought id give it a go myself. For this I found some knitted rope on Amazon, and some easily mouldable copper wire. I then had a mare getting the wire into the knitted rope, but when I did, it was fun seeing what I could come up with. I then went and made a ‘play’ and ‘explore’ word wire and later added a dinosaur and rocket.

Make his own Space.

Giving Munchkin his own space also fits with our Montessori way of parenting. It gives him some ownership and a space he knows is his. A space he can have his snack, find his morning milk, play, paint, draw and enjoy.

toddler wall on a budget
Enjoy Munchkin!

What do you think? Let me know in the comments!

Thanks for reading,

Daddy and Munchkin

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Febrile Convulsion in Children

*The information in this post is based on the advice from NHS UK. Please always follow your own area’s medical advice.

One hot day in May…

The reason I wanted to post about Febrile Convulsion (temperature related seizure in young children) is because we experienced one in Munchkin recently during half term and I wish I had known more before.

It was a very hot day and we spent a lot of time in the garden playing in and around the paddling pool. Toward the afternoon, Munchkin got very hot and sleepy. Thinking it was heat exhaustion, we gave him plenty to drink, popped his feet up and lay on the sofa to an episode of Hey Duggee. Twenty minutes later he was back to himself running about the house. We were immediately more cautious, staying inside and keeping water arms length from Munchkin.

He went to bed as normal, in limited clothes as it was very hot. The only difference we noticed is that he asked to sleep asking “Munchkin sleep now”, while It’s normally a little more difficult.

It must have been around 9:30 pm went we heard a weird noise come from Munchkin. We instantly turned on the camera app and witnessed his first seizure, running to his bedside and calling 999. After nearly 24 hours Munchkin was back home, the only lasting effect being Mummy and Daddy watching him like hawk ever since.

Part of me just wished we had known more, to ease our fears a little. Hence I am writing this post.

Febrile Convulsion in Children

Febrile Convulsion’s are brief seizures which can occur when a child (normally aged between 6 months to 6 years) is running a temperature. This is because, in developing children, the high temperature can disturb normal brain activity. It’s commonplace, with three cases in every 100 children and children fully recover with no lasting effect on learning or development.

Normally children only have one in their life (with 1 in 3 experiencing more than one). The overall risk of epilepsy is slightly increased after experiencing a febrile convulsion.

Febrile convulsion in children

Preventing Febrile Convulsion

Febrile convulsions are caused by running a high temperature, so, whilst not completely effective, the methods to prevent them are the same as treating a high temperature:

  • Keep your child hydrated
  • Treat with Paracetamol or Ibuprofen following normal dosage limits.
  • Cool their bedroom and remove clothing if sweating.

If a convulsion happens its important to place them in the recovery position and clear the area for anything that could harm them. Keep track of how long the seizure lasts.

When to call 999

We were right to call an ambulance as it was Munchkin’s first seizure.

Call 999 if:

  • Your child looks unwell or septic (symptoms of Sepsis – NHS UK)
  • It’s the child’s first convulsion.
  • Your child has several short convulsions in a short space of time or more than one in 24 hours.
  • If the seizure is a focal seizure. This means its on one side of their body or may last longer than 24 hours.

Further reading

Febrile seizures – NHS (www.nhs.uk)


As I said, the only effect for Munchkin has been me and Mummy watching him like a hawk and stalking him with a water bottle on hot days. We just wish we had this information beforehand, to allay our fears at the time.

Thanks for reading,

Daddy and Munchkin

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Encouraging Children to Read

Children often love to read without motivation but sometimes they need some encourgement. For example, statistics have shown that previously, only 58% of children enjoy to read and only 30.8% read daily (based on 49,049 children and young people aged eight to 18). I believe what we do to stimulate reading enjoyment in Munchkin will hopefully make him one of those 50%, be it making it fun, accessible or part of routine.

Make books visible and accessible

How many times do you want or need to do something but can’t be bothered because the thing you need is in a different room or upstairs? Its the same with reading. Keep books accessible and visible. Put them in their bedroom, and downstairs in their play room or share the bottom shelf of the bookcase so they are always on hand.

Once, we were trying to be more tidy and conseuqently, Munchkins books became less visible. We instantly noticed a dramatic decline in the amount he actively chose to read. We quickly realised that, as he would not see books he would therefore not be enticed to read them.

Make it routine

The easiest way to start reading with young children is to make it part of the routine. We have always let Munchkin choose two books before bed and offer them whenever he wants to do change activity. Sometimes one book leads two and then to a whole stack of them.

Incite their imagination

Incite their imagination by expanding on the story. Try asking ‘what could happen next?’ or ‘what noise would that animal make?’ or ‘what would your super power be? We find you can talk around the book for much longer than just simply reading it, and it adds much more value and learning to the story. I find it makes it much more interesting too, especially if its one of their favourites they have asked you to read on repeat.

Similarly, maintain your enthusiasm, no matter how many times you have read a certain book. Reading to children should always be approached with enthusiasm and emphasis, and this should be the case whether its the first read or the 50th.

Don’t restrict reading to books.

Reading shouldn’t just be with books. Engage in reading whenever the moment arises. For example, Munchkin likes to sound out letters on notices and road signs, when we walk, and we tell him what they say. Real life learning on the go at its best.

Let them read to you. Even before they can.

I got this little nugget from Munchkin himself. Sometimes he wants to take the driving seat and read to us, ‘Daddy read this one, (Munchkin) read this one’. Its a great way to see a book through his eyes and allows us to incite his imagination by asking around what he picks up, next time. It’s honestly surprising how much of a story Munchkin can relay at just two years 4 months old.

Get books related to their interests

Seems an obvious one, as no one likes to read things that do not interest them, but its essential advice. If they like peppa pig, she has books, if they love the ocean, you can get plenty about the sea, if they like being eco-friendly there’s books for that too and of course, Duggee has them (woof woof!).

It would be no surprise to you that Munchkin loves a bit of nature if you saw his book collection with ‘woods’, ‘under the sea’ and nature crossovers like ‘flamingo play’s bingo’.

Incorporate books into play

Consider setting up an activity around a book theme. For example, set up a nature play zone around ‘That’s not my hedgehog’, or get a book on trains and get the tracks out. The options are endless.

Talk around the written words

While its lovely to read the book word for word, it can stimulate their imaginations by adding extra details. Put simply, just say what you see.

Thanks for reading, enjoy reading more books!

Do you have any tips to encourage reading in your children?

Daddy and Munchkin

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Our National Trust Top Four

While we only started our membership during the Covid-19 pandemic, we have managed to visit a good handful of National Trust properties. While Oxburgh Hall and the Dunstable downs and a few others didn’t quite make the list, here are our top four of the National Trust properties so far. (This post will get updated over time as we visit more locations).

4. Clumber Park, Worksop

Clumber park is a huge expanse of woodland and park land situated off the A1, south of Worksop. It has many a peaceful walk surrounded completely by nature, letting you feel totally disconnected. This is the property we first saw Munchkin’s love for nature grow. His little nine-month old eyes lit up when he first saw the trees towering above him and his love for nature hasn’t changed since.


3. Belton House, Grantham

Belton House is a one of the properties I visited as a child, and we have revisited many a time with Munchkin. It has a giant wooden park which, for a little one, stretches for miles, is the National Trusts biggest play area, and is topped off with a woodland train to give you a swift ride through the trees. Belton House hosts fantastic Christmas light displays (which we will certainly be visiting this winter) and has a fantastic property (which you can visit again now).


2. Anglesey Abbey, Cambridge

Just pipped by Cliveden for the top spot, Anglesey Abbey was the first property to fuel my passion for visiting National Trust properties. Set in 114 acres, north-east of Cambridge, Anglesey abbey features a fantastic woodland park (which is sadly currently closed due to Covid-19) and fabulous seasonal gardens which surprise us on every visit. We love a stroll or toddler-run up and down the tree -lined grass walkways and an amble alongside the river which leads up to a working water mill.


1. Cliveden, Maidenhead

Set on a stretch of the Thames, north-west of London, this property has miles and miles of woodland and riverbank to wonder. It boasts a fantastic property (albeit one we’ve only seen from the outside as we visited during Covid times, during our October getaway). There’s a fantastic wooden storybook themed play area, a wooden play trail, options for boating trips and absolutely stunning gardens.

We learned a lesson at this one which we found out the hard way. If you walk the many miles up to the southern car park and then down the Thames, this may be a beautiful walk but there is a chance your toddler will get tired, go in the pushchair and fall asleep. But that’s fine right? Well not when the return up the hill is many many steep steps, which is a challenge with all the day’s bags, a pushchair and a toddler sleeping inside!

That said, it is such a fantastic and beautiful property. The view of the Thames is spectacular, and there’s plenty for the kids to do when not wondering through the woodland. That’s why its made the top spot.

National Trust Membership

As mentioned in the intro, we have a National Trust membership which grants us access to the houses and gardens, free parking (at most properties) and a handy dandy guidebook. For two adults its only £10/month and for a family of two adults plus children its only £10.50. To compare, a visit to Cliveden costs £15 per adult and £7.50 per child aged 5 – 17, with children under 5 go free, so membership was a no brainer for us.


Which is your favourite National Trust? Let me know in the comments.

Thanks for reading,

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The Big Jump back to Normality

With the vaccination programme in full swing, and even with the slight disturbance from the new Covid-19 variants, things seem to be looking up and we are on the road to normality. With the situation improving, comes exciting times ahead, but with these exciting times I personally have an approach with a anxious sense of apprehension, as the return to normality comes with some big big changes and a big jump back to normality.

people at concert, return back to normality
Doesn’t this seem a world away?
Photo by Vishnu R Nair on Pexels.com

Let’s start with the positives though, writing this in the week of 26 June means my age (the big 30) are now eligible for the vaccine and I’m all booked for my two doses and ready and raring to go. By the end of August, I’ll be fully vaccinated and ready for normality, or at least my immune system will be…

Being vaccinated is great as I have a lot to look forward to. In August alone, we have a holiday to Center Parcs booked, one we have pushed back three times now. I’m going to a festival in London, the crystal maze experience, and to see Hamilton. Its going to be a mega month.

The last time we made it to Center Parcs with a tiny Munchkin.

And that is where, sitting at home and writing this where I have lived, worked and spent a lifetime on Netflix for the majority of the pandemic, I find it hard to see myself back out there, as exciting as those things are. It is such a big jump from this house to a festival environment or packed into a theatre.

This is nothing new though, and I’ve always explained this as my comfort zone having to adapt. When things change, like starting a new project at work, and I find it hard to immediately adjust and feel a little out of place. Give it a week or so and my ‘comfort zone’ expands and I relax and enjoy the new challenge. The trouble with coming out of lockdown though, is that my comfort zone has to expand a lot further than it ever has before. Time will tell really how easy that is.

That said I cannot wait to see people again properly. My best mates have a new little baby that really needs a cuddle (or maybe it’s me that needs a baby snuggle?) and it will be wonderful to have lunchtime walks with my work ‘twinny’ again. It’s just such a big change.

How do you feel about returning to normal? Let me know in the comments.

Thanks for reading,

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Ways for Dads to bond with a Newborn

From the moment you enter the maternity ward, your world flips upside down. You used to be the decider of your sleep schedule and knew roughly what time of day it was by how you felt. Suddenly, as you appear from that sauna hot room of first cries, sweat and tears, everything has changed. Your now a Dad and so here’s some tips to help bond with that little ball of cuteness.

Rewind! Bonding starts with the bump

I got a little ahead of myself there. Bonding actually starts way before you even think about packing your hospital bag. From six months of ‘cooking’ inside Mummy’s belly, your little one can begin to learn. I’ll admit its weird at first, but then this is the time to introduce yourself, so they know who you are from day one. Oh and so they are used to your terrible singing voice from the onset!

Hello, little one

From day one there are many things you can do to build your bond, many of which are super simple.

Be present

No little one is going to bond with someone who isn’t there. Make sure you’re at home and engaged with the new arrival. Cancel some pub trips, sport or xbox time, get on the sofa, and have a snuggle. Share the feeds, where possible and get up during the night, and share the feeds and nappy changes. Sit by the bath and help at bath time. Read a book at bedtime. Just be there.

Do things babies enjoy

It may seem obvious. But engage with the new baby by doing the things babies enjoy. Pull faces, smile, sing, rock, snuggle, and be the general goof you know you are. You’ll be rewarded by looks of joy, later smiles and then giggles.

Display affection with kisses and cuddles and have some skin to skin time. It works just as well for Dad just as much as Mum.

Have some one on one time

This has a double benefit. It gives Mum some time for some ‘me’ time and gives you time with your new child alone. Go for a walk, and get the satisfaction of all the smiles you get from passers-by. Or go one further, take your baby to ‘Rhyme time’ or ‘Messy play’ or ‘Baby massage’.

If you really want to go to town, and your other half doesn’t mind returning to work early, do we me and my Wifey did, and share parental leave. My wife Natalie took the first six months, and I took the latter. This meant I had 8 hours on one on one with Munchkin every week day and boy, did we have fun. You can read about SPL (shared parental leave) in this post.

And that’s as simple

Thanks for reading, do you have any other tips?

And if you are a new Dad, have a read of ‘Five tips for a New Dad‘ which echoes similar sentiments to this post with other tips for new Dads.

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Twenty hours to parenting…

Our Birth Story

Natalie returns from a long term at work ready for a half term rest, a week before the Munchkin or Munchkiness is due to arrive. We didn’t know what we were due to have as we wanted the surprise.

Whilst I’m still at work, Natalie has a week off to prepare, pack the hospital essentials and get mentally prepared for pregnancy. Most babies go either full term or are a little late right?…


A normal Friday night…

We returned from work to a normal Friday night (well, a normal Friday night with a wife pregnant at full term, that is) stayed up a little late (as it was the start of half term) and we went to bed like any other weekend.


Saturday morning arrived. Natalie woke with some uncomfort, but then again when was pregnancy ever comfy…? We migrated downstairs, had brekky and relaxed on the sofa. The relatively NEW sofa I must add.

I look to Natalie. ‘Being a new sofa, do you reckon we should grab a towel just incase’. ‘Nah, I’m sure nothing with happen today’ she replied. We resume with whatever Netflix series we were engrossed in at the time.

The lies!

30 minutes later – 10 AM

30 minutes later Natalie looks to me. It’s 10 am on the first day of half term. ‘Oh no!’….It’s too late to get a towel now as the sofa gets the full effect of her waters breaking. ‘This can’t start today! It’s too soon!’.

Let the madness begin. A quiet morning coffee turns into a tirade of panic packing, quick decisions and gathering the last few bits for the birth bag.

10:15 AM

Natalie moves to the bathroom. From what we had seen on TV, waters breaking looked like you’d spilt water down yourself or, at worst, wet yourself. This looked more like the Niagara Falls for a full hour. The first surprise of the day.

At the same time Natalie rings the hospital. We get told this could be the start of a two day process and we should call back when the contractions begin.

Only an hour later – 11:15 AM

The waters stop and the contractions begin. We ring back. We are told its still early days and to ‘Call back when they are 5 minutes apart’.

11:30 AM

The contractions are 5 apart. ‘We understand you want to leave now but relax and call back when the contractions are 2 minutes apart.

I probably should have just stayed on the line.

11:39 AM

Natalie can no longer speak because of the contractions. I ring but they insist to speak to her. She wants to push and just about gets that across in limited speech. Get in the car NOW!!

12:00 PM

We grab everything we can think of and jump in the car. Usually the commute to the hospital would take 30 minutes maximum. But not today. Today they are cutting some bushes so there are traffic lights. Today it takes over 50 minutes.

12:50 PM

We arrive at the hospital and begin a slow walk up to the sauna, sorry, delivery suite. We wait then get taken to the triage ward. The nurse gets Natalie on the bed and then the phone rings and she pops off. We made it, we can relax. The bags are still in the car but ill collect them in a bit. Natalie’s still in nice clothes, but we’ve got hours right?

Natalie asks me to take a look as something feels different.

I crouch to have a look. Shocked, I can already see Munchkin’s little head popping out. I jump out of the curtains.

The nurse is still on the phone. I begin the ‘I really need you to see this’ dance until she gets the message and finishes the call.

The nurse follows me back in. The alarms go off and the team rush in.

One push, the head is out, push two. You’ve had a boy!

13:22

On the first day of half term, one week early, Munchkin arrives. In the triage ward, to two totally shocked and mentally unprepared new parents.

And that, was the fastest morning of my life.

Thanks for reading,

Daddy and Munchkin.

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Splosh Review

It’s time for ‘another way to reduce plastic product review from me with a Splosh Review.

I have already swapped out my general cleaner/ window cleaner/ toy cleaner/ floor cleaner for Koh (which you can find the review here), and my dishwasher tab and washing tab provider for Smol (this review still needs writing!).

These changes still left the problem of buying soap bottles, washing up liquid and toilet cleaner. Whilst these are all fully recyclable by combining general curbside recycling and Terracycle, I thought there could be a better alternative, and for that I turned to Splosh.

Splosh seem to have solved the plastic problem in a different way. Rather than producing and supplying endless plastic bottles they send you one (or as many as you need, like soap and toilet cleaner as you may want one per bathroom). That one bottle lasts and with that, you’ve saved 95% of plastic waste. They do hand soap, washing up liquid, laundry detergent, surface cleaner…. and more.

But you want to save 100% plastic?

Well you can. You can then get refills to resupply the original bottles. These refills are concentrated, so supply a number of refills before they are empty. You can then, save up the refill pouches and send them back for free. Simple, and then its 100% plastic free with an endless reuse and recycle system. The fact the refills are concentrated too also saves on the environmental costs related to shipping, so that’s another win, oh and they fit through the letterbox!


For this review we tried the grapefruit washing up liquid, rose and lotus blossom and blackberry soap and mint and eucalyptus toilet cleaner.

Both the soaps are foaming and moisturising leaving your hands feeling fresh, the toilet cleaner smells lovely and fresh and the washing up liquid is tough and smells summery and fresh. Overall, in terms of scent and effectiveness, the Splosh products work exactly as the standard alternatives (like Fairy washing up liquid, and Carex soap).

But Isn’t refilling a pain?

It’s simple. For the soap, just fill to the line on each bottle with hot water, top up to the neck with the refill solution and shake. in this example, one refill refills the soap bottle 6 times, although others are simply refill and use.

It must be expensive then?

Compared to leading hand soap providers, this does clock a little higher at 8p per 100 ml more. However, if you subscribe you save 10% and with big refills you can save even more. As the website says, ‘With each refill, you get that flicker of satisfaction you’re doing something good for the planet’ which makes up for the tiny price increase.

Overall, its a keeper for me and I thoroughly recommend it.

The ratings

If you’re interested in Splosh, I have a referral code you can use below.

Referral code: IPQMARYYX6

Daddy reviewed, Munchkin approved.

Thanks for reading,

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